Persistence, Patience and Power

By | July 24, 2011

I’m constantly amazed at the places that potential learning opportunities pop-up. I often drive down a country road near a Civil War battlefield. I usually find the rural scenery relatively relaxing.

persistence, patience and powerOne day, I happened to notice something that I had somehow missed on all my previous trips by the fields along the road. Right in the middle of one of the fields stood a tree. It was only about 25 or 30 feet tall, but I was nevertheless taken somewhat aback that a tree had somehow managed to grow right in the middle of the field.

When I took a closer look, I saw the secret to the tree’s survival. It had sprouted in the edge of a ditch, out of reach from plows, tractors and other equipment that would have ended it’s life if it was anywhere else.

It reminded me that there are times in life when we have to find a spot away from harmful distractions that keep us from growing and accomplishing our goals. If we’re where we supposed to be, we should develop an attitude of persistence while avoiding the people and things that would hold us back.

While the tree is not very big, I can tell that it has been around for at least 10 years of so. It grew nearly sideways early in it’s life but later headed skyward as it was meant to do.

Sometimes, we have to take a different route than originally planned, but if we keep trying, we’ll find a way to where we need to be. In time, our patience will be rewarded.

I’m not sure what kind of tree it is, but I know that it has made it through thunderstorms, drought and snow showers. It wouldn’t stand out in a forest, but it certainly stands out in the middle of the field.

If we find our mission in life, we’ll have the strength to carry it out. Power comes to those who know where they’re going.

Next time you feel a little pressure, remember that persistence, patience and power can help you grow despite your circumstances.

Lessons learned while watching Wambach

By | July 10, 2011

I just finished watching the USA women move into the semi-finals of the World Cup soccer tournament. In case you missed it, the United States team was behind until Abby Wambach scored a goal just before the game ended.

Earlier, it seemed like everything was going against the team, including several questionable calls. But the U.S. players ended up winning on penalty kicks when goalie Hope Solo made a great save and Ali Krieger made the winning kick.

I took away a few lessons from the game. I learned similar lessons from Landon Donavan last year.

The first is, as Jim Valvano often said, “Never, give up!” ESPN’s Jeff Carlisle says the game was a triumph of self-belief over skill.

The U.S. players kept playing even when it seemed like they were surely going to lose. Abby Wambach’s header into the goal came in time that was added to the end of the game because injuries earlier.

The second lesson is that sometimes you need to keep trying even if you fail the first few times.

U.S. player Megan Rapinoe had made a number of passes that had not found their mark, but her pass to Wambach was a thing of beauty. Rapinoe kicked it to the absolutely best spot for Wambach to score.

The third lesson was something I almost missed, have confidence.

I watched the replay about 10 times. On about the third, I noticed that Wambach raised her hand just before Rapinoe kicked the ball toward her.

Wambach wanted the ball to come to her, even though several players from Brazil were around. She wanted it, she got it and she tied the game because of it.

The next time you face an obstacle in your business or in life, have confidence, keep trying and never give up.

Winning results — Lessons from Landon

By | June 24, 2010

Don’t stop running.

That’s the lesson we can learn from Landon Donovan. As you likely know, Donovan was the player who scored the goal that kept the United States alive in the World Cup soccer tournament. You’ve probably seen the video of him booting the ball in after another player had missed.

What you might not realize is that Donovan had actually passed the ball to another player a few seconds earlier. After passing the ball, he could have slowed down and watched to see if the other players were going to score.

He didn’t. He kept running. As a result, when the ball bounced off the goal-keeper, Donovan was there to send the ball into the back of the net.

Donovan’s goal set off a wild celebration by the U.S. team and its fans. Instead of being eliminated, they won their group and get to play in the single-elimination part of the tournament.

Sports Illustrated’s Grant Wahl talks about how the U.S. team has a flair for drama and a whole lot of heart in an article about the match. He recaps the heroics and Donovan’s comments about the joy he feels now after playing poorly in the World Cup four years ago.

“I’m so glad it culminated in this way,” Donovan said. “It makes me believe in good from the world. And when you try to do things the right way, it’s good to see you get rewarded.”

So in business and in life, sometimes we need to keep running. Who knows how many people give up just before they find success? They get frustrated at the slightest failure and stop.

Instead, look at failures as learning opportunities. When something doesn’t go right, then you’ll know what not to do next time. Successful people learn from their mistakes.

So keep trying. Keep running. You never know when you’ll get the opportunity to reach your GOOAAAALLLLL!

Successful business plan — Make compassion your passion

By | June 21, 2010

Everyone in business is looking for a successful business plan. They realize that the old adage is true that failing to plan is planning to fail.
Smart Spaces Symposium
Creative Commons License photo credit: centralasian

I’d like to suggest that before you adopt a business plan, first take a look at your values. Knowing what you believe will keep you from doing things that you’ll regret later.

And if you already have a business plan, being clear on your values will help you clarify and if needed refine it to fit your beliefs.

For example, most people are compassionate. When they see someone in need, they usually feel the urge to help.

Having a clear sense of your values, will convert that urge into action.

Some people think that compassion has no place in business. They believe caring for people won’t cut it in the cut-throat world of profit-making.

This is often magnified among network marketers who are taught to look on friends and family members as money-making prospects.

Here’s a suggestion that goes against the grain: go to great lengths to show how much you care for people. Compassion is not only proper, but required to run a successful business.

Gauge the success of your business, not by how much money you make, but by how much good you do and how many people you help.

Making the world, or at least your corner of it, a better place is the beginning of a successful business plan.

Network marketing plan: New year, higher goals

By | December 31, 2009

As 2010 gets started, I thought I’d pass on a goal setting tip I got from Chris Brogan‘s newsletter a few months ago (you can sign up for the newsletter here).

Brogan passed on an idea
he got from Bre Pettis, an innovator and designer. You write down your “most audacious goal” on a big, white sheet of paper. Then you go backwards with ways that you can accomplish it.

Those ways become your goals. Brogan calls them “lighthouses” that will keep you on course. Think about potential obstacles between you and them. Then find a way around them.
lighthouse 038
Creative Commons License photo credit: Indy Kethdy

This seems like a simple, but effective, method to reach your highest goals.

On a related note, Brogan’s newsletter also contained some interesting personal information about his blogging experience. He said he didn’t have 100 readers until he’d been writing for eight years. It took him 10 years to develop what he called “business value” for what he was doing.

Today, he’s one of the top bloggers on the web.

All that is evidence that you shouldn’t give up on your goals. Two of most successful network marketers I know didn’t start making serious income until they’d been in the profession for more than 12 years.

Imagine if they’d given up about seven, or nine, or even 11 years.

Set your goals.

Make your plan.

Stick with it.

Steve DeVane

(NOTE — This free e-book helped me get my business on track.)

Network marketing internet business: It’s not a hobby

By | December 19, 2009

I came across an interesting post the other day called “This is a Business, Not a Hobby.”

Jim Kukral via jimkukral.com

Jim Kukral via jimkukral.com

The piece was written by Jim Kukral, who works with small businesses on web marketing. It cites a post on Copyblogger called “The Three Fatal Diseases that Kill Good Blogs.” Kukral’s article focuses on social media,  email marketing, affiliate marketing and online public relations, but his point applies perfectly to network marketers who are trying to build their business using the Internet.

“We’re doing this to make money, or leads, or get publicity. Not for fun. Not for ‘friends.’ Until you flip that switch in your head where you understand this, you’re going to continue to find it very hard to find success on the Internet.”

Kukral talks about how some bloggers are still not making money even though some have shown that “blogging is in fact a great way to do business.” Despite this, some still treat it as a hobby, he said.

“Here’s why. Because ‘regular people’ are the people who start blogs. They’re not marketers. They’re not entrepreneurs. They are people who have a passion about something and they want to share that passion with the rest of the world without having a gatekeeper tell them they can’t.”

Similarly, most network marketers are “regular people” with little or no marketing experience. They have a passion to share their products or services and opportunity with other people.

Many network marketers promote their businesses with blogs. Kukral points out how things are changing for bloggers.

“We’re no longer bloggers anymore, we’re ‘publishers.’ The majority of people don’t start blogs anymore just to waste time. They want something out of it. It may not be money they want. It may be fame. Whatever it is, they want something for their effort, and that makes them a publisher.”

Think about that the next time you’re writing a post. Make it something worth publishing. Make it worthy of your business.

And in case you’re using other online methods to promote your business, Kukral has these thoughts about how people spoke ill of him when he started using his blog to make money.

“What happened to me in 2004 is the same thing that is happening now to social media. We’re all being told we shouldn’t try to make money with social media. It’s pure, they say. Leave it alone, you’ll ruin it.

“This is ALL a business, not a hobby.”

Jim Rohn: The qualities of skillful leadership

By | December 5, 2009

(NOTE — Jim Rohn, one of the great personal development philosophers of our time and one of my favorite motivational authors, died today. Below is one of his many articles that influenced me. It is reprinted in his honor.)

Jim Rohn (via JimRohn.com)

Jim Rohn (via JimRohn.com)

If you want to be a leader who attracts quality people, the key is to become a person of quality yourself. Leadership is the ability to attract someone to the gifts, skills and opportunities you offer as an owner, as a manager, as a parent. I call leadership the great challenge of life.

What’s important in leadership is refining your skills. All great leaders keep working on themselves until they become effective. Here are some specifics:

1) Learn to be strong but not rude. It is an extra step you must take to become a powerful, capable leader with a wide range of reach. Some people mistake rudeness for strength. It’s not even a good substitute.

2) Learn to be kind but not weak. We must not mistake kindness for weakness. Kindness isn’t weak. Kindness is a certain type of strength. We must be kind enough to tell somebody the truth. We must be kind enough and considerate enough to lay it on the line. We must be kind enough to tell it like it is and not deal in delusion.

3) Learn to be bold but not a bully. It takes boldness to win the day. To build your influence, you’ve got to walk in front of your group. You’ve got to be willing to take the first arrow, tackle the first problem, discover the first sign of trouble.

4) You’ve got to learn to be humble, but not timid. You can’t get to the high life by being timid. Some people mistake timidity for humility. Humility is almost a God-like word. A sense of awe. A sense of wonder. An awareness of the human soul and spirit. An understanding that there is something unique about the human drama versus the rest of life. Humility is a grasp of the distance between us and the stars, yet having the feeling that we’re part of the stars. So humility is a virtue; but timidity is a disease. Timidity is an affliction. It can be cured, but it is a problem.

5) Be proud but not arrogant. It takes pride to win the day. It takes pride to build your ambition. It takes pride in community. It takes pride in cause, in accomplishment. But the key to becoming a good leader is being proud without being arrogant. In fact I believe the worst kind of arrogance is arrogance from ignorance. It’s when you don’t know that you don’t know. Now that kind of arrogance is intolerable. If someone is smart and arrogant, we can tolerate that. But if someone is ignorant and arrogant, that’s just too much to take.

6) Develop humor without folly. That’s important for a leader. In leadership, we learn that it’s okay to be witty, but not silly. It’s okay to be fun, but not foolish.

Lastly, deal in realities. Deal in truth. Save yourself the agony. Just accept life like it is. Life is unique. Some people call it tragic, but I’d like to think it’s unique. The whole drama of life is unique. It’s fascinating. And I’ve found that the skills that work well for one leader may not work at all for another. But the fundamental skills of leadership can be adapted to work well for just about everyone: at work, in the community and at home.

To Your Success,

Jim Rohn

(Reproduced with permission from Jim Rohn’s Weekly E-zine. To subscribe, go to www.JimRohn.com All contents Copyright © JimRohn.com except where indicated otherwise. All rights reserved worldwide.)

Network marketing success: Service with a smile

By | November 30, 2009

Those who find network marketing success have learned the importance of serving other people.

The other day my wife had an experience with a local business which reminded me of the importance of customer service for any business, including network marketing. A few weeks ago, my wife was cleaning the carpet when our vacuum cleaner stopped working.
254_tile_Carpet
Creative Commons License photo credit: reitveld

We have an older model Rainbow vacuum cleaner, which usually does a great job getting the dirt out of the carpets. But that day it stopped picking up anything.

My wife asked me to look at it. Since I know next to nothing about vacuum cleaners, I wasn’t surprised when I couldn’t figure out what was wrong.

It was in the evening
so we decided to wait until later to figure out what to do. We didn’t think about it again until the middle of the afternoon last Friday. After I took another look at it, reaffirming my lack of expertise in the matter, I suggested we take it to a repair shop in a nearby town.

My wife called the shop to find out how late they were open. A short while later she left with the vacuum cleaner.

In my mind, I was thinking we’d have to borrow or rent a replacement so we could get the carpet cleaned for a dinner party we’re having at our house next weekend. But about an hour later, my wife was back home with the repaired vacuum cleaner.

She said the folks at the shop looked at the vacuum cleaner immediately. After a few minutes, they figured out what was wrong and fixed it for a reasonable rate. They also sold her a new hose that we needed at a decent price.

All in all
, they were nice, prompt and professional.

Guess who will be getting all our vacuum cleaner business from now on. And guess where we’ll suggest our friends go when they have similar needs.

Network marketers can learn a lesson from this experience. Too often we pounce on anyone we consider a prospect. And if we don’t think they’re a prospect we pay little or no attention to them.

Here’s the better plan: treat everyone the same way you’d want to be treated. Do this and the prospecting will take care of itself.

Steve DeVane

This mentoring program taught me to help everyone succeed.

Network marketing success: Three ways to strengthen your business

By | November 24, 2009

The search for network marketing success can be a long, confusing journey. It seems like you can find tips, strategies, advice and recommendations all over the Internet.

Often lost in all the confusion is one of the most basic rules of network marketing — if you want to improve your business, improve yourself. Personal development can, of course, take many forms, but I’ve found that one of the most important keys for me is to focus on my strengths.
Bodybuilder
Creative Commons License photo credit: toiletbowl martini

In other words, if I concentrate on doing what I do well, my chances for success in network marketing increase. The first step is to find your strengths.

Here are three quick, easy questions you can ask yourself that will help you discover your strengths.

• What brings you joy?

This may sound easy, but many people struggle when they give this question serious thought. We’re often programmed as young children to forget about those things that make you happy. Misguided parents often think this spares their children from future heartbreak.

• What frustrates you in other people?

Think of those times when someone you know has had a difficult time performing a task that you consider easy. There’s a good chance that the task is in an area of one of your strengths.

• What do other people praise your for that you think is no big deal?

Remember when you did something that someone else couldn’t stop talking about, but you just shrugged off because it was easy for you. That’s because it involved some aspect of a strength for you.

Early in life we develop skills that are built on our strengths. Later, in school and in our careers we develop skills that are outside our strengths. When we face challenges in those areas, we get in trouble.

The truth is, we perform better when we focus on our strengths.

This is one of the great things
about network marketing. You can work out of your strengths and build a team to help you take care of the aspects of business that you find most challenging.

Success in network marketing
comes easiest and fastest when we do our best. We do our best when we utilize our strengths.

Steve DeVane

(This ebook helped me understand how I could use my strengths to find network marketing success.)

Internet network marketing — You’re the king

By | November 14, 2009

Chris Brogan, an Internet marketing expert, recently wrote a post called, “Content is Not King” that applies perfectly to Internet network marketing.

“Content is king” has become something of a catch phrase in internet marketing. It urges bloggers to concentrate most on the content of their posts. If you want readers, the thinking goes, you must first give them something worthwhile to read. That logic has gone pretty much unchallenged among those “in the know” about how to be successful online.

Chris Brogan (via chrisbrogan.com)

Chris Brogan (via chrisbrogan.com)

But Chris Brogan takes issue with the adage.

“Content is not king. You are. (or Queen.) Content is currency. You’re the king.”

Instead, he says, content is a way for bloggers to “deliver interest.”

“It’s a gathering place for you and the people you hope to entertain/attract/educate/equip. That doesn’t make it the king.”

Chris Brogan calls content “treasure,” “salve,” and “wood for the fireplace around which great stories are told.”

“Work hard on content, but focus on relationships,” he says.

This fits perfectly with how best to run a network marketing blog, which is a perfect place to build relationships. After all, network marketing involves both networking and marketing, but not necessarily in that order. The business works best when you market to large numbers of people, then network with the ones who show interest in your product, service or opportunity.

So think about the content of your blog as the marketing aspect. You write valuable content to attract lots of readers. To build off Chris Brogan’s analogy, you provide a campfire where your stories will warm their souls.

But, as Brogan says, the ultimate focus should be on the relationships. With no networking, there’s no network marketing.

Once you learn that lesson then you can be yourself with other people.

Do that and you’ll be the king of your content.



WordPress Loves AJAX