Focus like an Olympian

As I was watching the Olympics recently, I was thinking about how all the athletes had sacrificed much to make it to the Games.

That type of singular focus is admirable. I couldn’t help but think how each of them had discovered the sport they loved and worked at it until they became great at it.

It also reminded me of how important it is to have focus in our network marketing business. It’s easy to go from one idea to the next and the next while we seek success.

Many new networkers are just learning one technique when another one comes along that makes them leave the first one. Instead it’s better to find an approach that works and master it. Once you’ve got it under control, then you can try another.

In short, a narrower focus is almost always better than a broader effort.

That’s why many who are trying to develop “multiple streams of income” struggle. It sounds like a good idea, but in practice it usually doesn’t work.

Steve DeVane

Network marketing that works

Many network marketers struggle early in their careers.

One reason they flounder is because they lack focus. Sometimes they don’t know what to do. Sometimes they don’t do what they know.

Network marketing is a business, but most networkers don’t treat it that way. One good way to start is to treat it like a job. Here’s some tips on how to do that.

Go to work like you’re getting a paycheck. Many networkers don’t take action. Even worse, when they act, they often take incorrect actions. It’s best to learn the right actions, and do them consistently.

Punch the clock. Decide when you can work, and work during that time.

Find a good sponsor and treat them like a boss. You need to learn the proper way to do the business. Find someone’s who is successful and learn from them. Tell them to tell you what to do. Then do it.

Don’t quit. You wouldn’t leave your job after a short amount of time, so don’t give up on networking so quickly. It takes time to be successful. Be patient. You’ll be rewarded.

Business building secrets – More than just one

Every once in a while you run across someone who says they have the secret to success.

The person may very well have something that will help you succeed, but in truth there is no one secret. There’s not a single thing that by itself will automatically grant you instant success. Instead there are many reasons for success. Here’s a few.

Do what you love. One of the most best things you can do for yourself and for your business is figure out why you’re doing what you’re doing. And while you’re thinking about it, understand that just making money isn’t enough to motivate most people.

Give. Nearly everyone who’s successful gives and gives and gives. You might be saying to yourself, “It’s easy for them to give because of they have, so much.” Instead, the opposite is true – they have much because they give much.

Find a system that works. Find something that’s proven to be successful and follow it.

Join a team. No one can build a business by themselves. You’ve got to have help.

Do it. Even the best plans are worthless without action. If you want the reward, do the work.

Steve DeVane

Make a decision and stick with it

Last year, I got to coach my daughter’s recreation league basketball team.

I was really looking forward to it. I knew since I hadn’t coached that age level before that my team probably wouldn’t be as talented as many of the other teams, but I thought we’d be competitive.

I was wrong. We lost every game. There were only two games that we had any chance of winning. Most games we got our doors blown off.

By the end of the year, I was totally frustrated. To be honest, I felt like a failure. Looking back, I’ve tried to find lessons that I could learn from the season.

I think I made two big mistakes.

First, I overestimated what the girls could learn. I had in mind several plays and several defenses that I thought they could play.

We practiced our plays, and we practiced our defenses, but when we played our first game we looked lost. It seemed as if we’d never been on a basketball court before.

After a similar performance the next game, I decided we had to scale back on what we were doing. That was my second mistake.

When I tried to get back to more basic basketball, the girls got even more confused. It took me several more games before I realized that the shift had made things worse. By then, it was too late to do much about it. I tried several desperate moves, but nothing worked.

So what’s the lesson? Once you’ve decided on a strategy stick with it until you have to change.

Napoleon Hill analyzed hundreds of successful men for his book, “Think and Grow Rich.” He discovered “that every one of them had the habit of REACHING DECISIONS PROMPTLY, and of changing these decisions SLOWLY, if, and when they were changed.”

Sometimes adjustments are needed when things go wrong, but don’t be too hasty to change directions at the smallest bump in the road.

Steve DeVane